Lake Guide

The following information about our local lakes is from the Tampa Bay Water Atlas website.

 

You may also wish to learn more about our lakes and waterways by exploring the Southwest Florida Water Management (SWFWMD) website.

 

 

Pretty

Surface Area

84.52 acres

Mean Depth

12.0 feet

Maximum Depth

30.0 feet

Approximate Volume

350,482,024 gallons

Watershed

Coastal Old Tampa Bay Watershed

 

Rock

Surface Area

53.98 acres

Mean Depth

7.0 feet

Maximum Depth

21.0 feet

Approximate Volume

113,864,497 gallons

Watershed

Coastal Old Tampa Bay Watershed

 

Josephine

Surface Area

48.29 acres

Mean Depth

7.0 feet

Maximum Depth

24.0 feet

Approximate Volume

111,487,453 gallons

Watershed

Coastal Old Tampa Bay Watershed

 

Armistead

Surface Area

33.12 acres

Mean Depth

8.0 feet

Maximum Depth

28.0 feet

Approximate Volume

96,612,517 gallons

Watershed

Coastal Old Tampa Bay Watershed

 

Keystone

Surface Area

434 acres

Mean Depth

11.0 feet

Maximum Depth

24.0 feet

Approximate Volume

1,509,570,177 gallons

Watershed

Coastal Old Tampa Bay Watershed

 

Island Ford

Surface Area

94.27 acres

Mean Depth

10.0 feet

Maximum Depth

23.0 feet

Approximate Volume

299,040,197 gallons

Watershed

Coastal Old Tampa Bay Watershed

 

Maurine

Surface Area

51.49 acres

Mean Depth

13.0 feet

Maximum Depth

21.0 feet

Approximate Volume

257,524,000 gallons

Watershed

Coastal Old Tampa Bay Watershed

 

Alice

Surface Area

87.75 acres

Mean Depth

8.0 feet

Maximum Depth

23.0 feet

Approximate Volume

278,789,045 gallons

Watershed

Coastal Old Tampa Bay Watershed

 

Taylor

Surface Area

43.83 acres

Mean Depth

10.0 feet

Maximum Depth

25.0 feet

Approximate Volume

155,207,146 gallons

Watershed

Coastal Old Tampa Bay Watershed

 

Calm

Surface Area

114 acres

Mean Depth

9.0 feet

Maximum Depth

31.0 feet

Approximate Volume

370,052,196 gallons

Watershed

Coastal Old Tampa Bay Watershed

 

Mound

Surface Area

83.71 acres

Mean Depth

13.0 feet

Maximum Depth

35.0 feet

Approximate Volume

338,327,876 gallons

Watershed

Coastal Old Tampa Bay Watershed

 

Hiawatha

Surface Area

61.66 acres

Mean Depth

12.0 feet

Maximum Depth

24.0 feet

Approximate Volume

293,519,627 gallons

Watershed

Coastal Pinellas/Anclote Watershed

 

Osceola

Surface Area

59.31 acres

Mean Depth

8.0 feet

Maximum Depth

22.0 feet

Approximate Volume

146,696,961 gallons

Watershed

Coastal Old Tampa Bay Watershed

 

Leclare

Surface Area

43.25 acres

Mean Depth

5.0 feet

Maximum Depth

17.0 feet

Approximate Volume

60,139,500 gallons

Watershed

Coastal Old Tampa Bay Watershed

 

Church

Surface Area

69.63 acres

Mean Depth

7.0 feet

Maximum Depth

24.0 feet

Approximate Volume

181,048,927 gallons

Watershed

Coastal Old Tampa Bay Watershed

 

Echo

Surface Area

28.53 acres

Mean Depth

8.0 feet

Maximum Depth

18.0 feet

Approximate Volume

88,874,377 gallons

Watershed

Coastal Old Tampa Bay Watershed

 

Carroll

Surface Area

210 acres

Mean Depth

10.0 feet

Maximum Depth

25.0 feet

Approximate Volume

1,070,501,055 gallons

Watershed

Coastal Old Tampa Bay Watershed

 

Rainbow

Surface Area

48.28 acres

Mean Depth

9.0 feet

Maximum Depth

22.0 feet

Approximate Volume

14,396,121 gallons

Watershed

Coastal Old Tampa Bay Watershed

 

Crescent

Size and Volume

Surface Area

48.04 acres

Mean Depth

11.0 feet

Maximum Depth

23.0 feet

Approximate Volume

164,462,280 gallons

Watershed

Coastal Old Tampa Bay Watershed

 

Magdalene

Size and Volume

Surface Area

252 acres

Mean Depth

8.0 feet

Maximum Depth

24.0 feet

Approximate Volume

609,842,098 gallons

Watershed

Coastal Old Tampa Bay Watershed

 

Thomas

Size and Volume

Surface Area

61.43 acres

Mean Depth

8.0 feet

Maximum Depth

23.0 feet

Approximate Volume

209,152,369 gallons

Watershed

Coastal Old Tampa Bay Watershed

 

Cooper

Size and Volume

Surface Area

79.98 acres

Mean Depth

11.0 feet

Maximum Depth

25.0 feet

Approximate Volume

299,217,000 gallons

Watershed

Coastal Old Tampa Bay Watershed

 

Stemper

Size and Volume

Surface Area

115 acres

Mean Depth

6.0 feet

Maximum Depth

18.0 feet

Approximate Volume

219,169,965 gallons

Watershed

Hillsborough Bay Watershed

 

Strawberry

Size and Volume

Surface Area

39.78 acres

Mean Depth

8.0 feet

Maximum Depth

18.0 feet

Approximate Volume

100,808,730 gallons

Watershed

Coastal Old Tampa Bay Watershed

 

Hobbs

Size and Volume

Surface Area

60.90 acres

Mean Depth

10.0 feet

Maximum Depth

22.0 feet

Approximate Volume

204,953,000 gallons

Watershed

Coastal Old Tampa Bay Watershed

 

Chapman

Size and Volume

Surface Area

42.29 acres

Mean Depth

7.0 feet

Maximum Depth

19.0 feet

Approximate Volume

101,662,488 gallons

Watershed

Coastal Old Tampa Bay Watershed

 

A true prior boating experience to whet your appetite for lake living.

 

How I wish “Holy crappadappa” was in my repertoire when Bill Sink met me in Marblehead to show me the finer points of sailing his boat.  Rather than take the public launch to reach the sloop in the vast harbor, I suggested my own craft.  It was a small, rectangular aluminum boat with three seats and an ancient outboard attached to the stern.  To make the outing more memorable, I’d invited my girlfriend Carol.  She asked if she could bring her mother Doris and I agreed, expecting to impress all of them with my seamanship skills.

 

Doris arrived at the boatyard wearing a white knee-length skirt, blue and white striped blouse with anchor buttons and navy colored epaulets.  Completing the wardrobe was a fashionable white scarf, tan pantyhose, and two-inch white heels.  I wasn’t sure which took longer, coordinating the wardrobe or applying the makeup.  Her foundation was at least an inch thick with dark commas for eyebrows keeping the mauve eye shadow from covering her forehead.  Doris’ sprayed her sandy blonde hair in a way not even a nor’easter could dislodge.  If this were Vegas instead of Marblehead, she’d have fit in perfectly.

 

To add to the cooler of beer already stowed aboard the dinghy, Doris contributed a clear plastic tray with deviled eggs held down with Saran wrap.  I was relieved Baked Alaska wasn’t on the menu.  As I considered the growing number of variables, I began to think about skipping the sail in favor of more modest ambitions, like window-shopping.  I could develop a sudden case of amnesia.  “What do you mean we’re going sailing?  We don’t even have a boat!”  A sudden call to deliver a baby would’ve been the perfect excuse, except I’m not an obstetrician.  With limited options, I decided to take my chances on the water. 

 

To her credit, Doris managed to descend the gangway to the floating dock where the dinghy was, while wearing her heels.  Perhaps I’d misjudged her.  Maybe this was all a clever disguise intended to conceal a salty woman, the veteran of many high seas adventures.

 

We climbed aboard the boat without incident.  Doris and her deviled eggs occupied the bow.  Bill and Carol sat in the middle while I worked to fire up the 1930’s outboard.  After five minutes of pulling the starter cord, adjusting the choke, and spraying starter fluid, it came to life in a great thundercloud of blue smoke.  We cast off to the fanfare of tugboat horns, sprayed fireboat salutes and a flotilla of well-wishers screaming, “Bon Voyage.”  

 

Before we were 100 yards from the dock, the bow nose-dived and a rush of cold harbor water washed over Doris and into the boat.  I cut the engine.  What little I knew about powerboats was that they are supposed to travel above the water, rather than below.  Doris’ skirt had turned from white to a wet gray and her heels sat in two inches of water.  I thought, if we could just reach the safety of the sailboat, we could salvage the day.  I asked Doris to move from the bow and sit on the cooler amidships.  With the weight redistributed, I tried again.  Thinking speed was the answer, I coaxed the engine to go even faster.  This time, an even larger wave filled the boat.  We were sinking.  Doris looked like they'd hosed her down to get rid of radioactivity.  A 14-year old boy who’d witnessed the spectacle from the shore rescued us, except for the deviled eggs.  I’d expected my guests would have a memorable day on the water, not in the water.  If only we’d gone window-shopping.

© 2020 Bill Riddle, Charles Rutenberg Realty.  All rights reserved.

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